CTS Computer Repair

CTS presents hassle free pc repair.

Another stealth tethering app will probably be pulled off the App Store any second… (Updated)

Update : It’s been yanked. These things tend not to survive long in the wild , but it’s your $2, have fun: audio capture iPhone app DiscoRecorder apparently has a secret, and it’s an Easter egg proxy server. If you follow a rather rococo set of network config steps ( detailed by 9to5Mac ), make a recording, and rename it “PearSauce269.aac” (really? OK, sure, why not) then voila! Free tethering, regardless of your iPhone data plan (but that will still use up your data allocation). [Update: Note that this will only work from your Mac, not your iPad, as it requires you to create an ad-hoc network to start with. If you went ahead and spent $2 thinking this would tether your iPad, sorry about that.] Given that the discovery of this feature was coincidentally and/or conveniently timed for a Friday evening, when the App Store minders have presumably fixie-biked off into the Cupertino sunset, there’s at least some chance the app will still be on the store in the morning — but needless to say this is not a good long-term plan for tethering. [hat tip Giz ] Another stealth tethering app will probably be pulled off the App Store any second… (Updated) originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Fri, 10 Aug 2012 22:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Source  |  Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

Visit link:
Another stealth tethering app will probably be pulled off the App Store any second… (Updated)

SPOT Connect helps your iPhone rescue you via satellite

Cellphones are pretty good for calling 911, or letting your family know where you are, but if you get in trouble off the grid things can go wrong in a hurry. Coverage is far from universal, especially in rural or wilderness areas. The folks at SPOT , a satellite service company, have a handy solution that lets your iPhone connect to a global satellite network through the SPOT hardware. Along with a dedicated app , the SPOT Connect transmitter can get your distress message out, along with your exact location anywhere in the world. Similar to the standalone SPOT Satellite GPS Messenger and the SPOT Personal Tracker (both of which work without a phone, but offer a more limited set of message options) the hardware is a small device with a GPS receiver and a satellite transmitter. The SPOT Connect pairs with your iPhone via Bluetooth; you run the SPOT app, and your iPhone suddenly becomes a satellite communicator. The service is not built for voice, but you can update Twitter or Facebook, send short email messages or text messages (41 characters long for free input, up to 120 characters if you pre-program them), update a plot of your travels on the SPOT website for family & friends, or send your coordinates out to the GEOS International Emergency Response Coordination Center to get help on the way. This seems perfect for sailors, hikers, pilots or people exploring places where cell networks are unreliable or don’t exist at all. The device is available direct from SPOT, or at a variety of retailers like Best Buy, REI and West Marine. It lists for US $149.95, and there is a mail-in $50.00 rebate available now. The needed app is free. You’ll also need a subscription that gets you the satellite time ($99.00 a year). There are some extra fees for extended services. This can literally be a lifesaver if you find yourself in the wilds, and it’s a clever integration of iPhone hardware and satellite technology. Gallery: SPOT Connect for iPhone SPOT Connect helps your iPhone rescue you via satellite originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Sat, 11 Aug 2012 11:55:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Source  |  Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

Read the article:
SPOT Connect helps your iPhone rescue you via satellite

driSuit endurance case: Take your iPhone swimming

During the opening ceremonies for the 2012 London Olympic Games, the number of athletes using iPhones to take photos and video during the “march of nations” was staggering. Who knows? When the 2016 Summer Games start up in Rio de Janeiro , the swimmers might be using their iPhones in the pools during their post-race celebrations if they pick up the driSuit endurance waterproof case for iPhone 4 and 4S (US$59.95). Design In the past I’ve looked at several waterproof iPhone cases, with the most successful at this point probably being the LifeProof cases. Those cases cost $10 more, but are tested to Military Specifications MIL-STD-810F-516.5 standards for shock and impact protection. How deep can you go in water with the driSuit? Tim Collins, general manager of driSuit Technologies, said that the case is tested at 5 meters — more than enough for snorkeling or surfing. The driSuit uses something that’s completely different to protect the iPhone’s screen — a fluidic membrane that contains a non-toxic fluid and allows for full use of the touch screen while submerged. That screen feels a bit weird at first, but you quickly realize that it works very well underwater for manipulating the iPhone’s touch screen. Gallery: driSuit endurance case for iPhone 4/4S Looks-wise, the driSuit endurance is nothing spectacular. The company does have some color versions that are probably more attractive than the black plastic model I received for review, but if you’re looking for a waterproof case I don’t think that fashion is your main goal in life. The iPhone 4 or 4S slides into the bottom of the case, after which time you snug a small door to the bottom and then click down two latches. There’s enough space in the back of the case to carry one credit card or piece of ID. As you’d expect, all openings are covered with a silicone material to prevent water from coming in. driSuit does sell waterproof headphones ($19.95) that work with the case, and there’s also a bright yellow flotation wrist strap ($9.95) to make sure that your iPhone is recovered in case you’re eaten by a shark. A regular wrist strap is included with the case and attaches through a mount on the top of the driSuit. Functionality Like the LifeProof case, driSuit asks you to test the endurance case to insure that you know how to properly latch it and that it does remain dry on the inside. To do this, you close the case and hold it underwater for 10 minutes (LifeProof suggests an hour). If no water leaks in, then you’ve closed the case properly and you’re ready to roll. I decided to give the driSuit the one-hour test, since I rely on my iPhone 4S and really didn’t want it to go for a swim if the case leaked. As expected, it came through high and dry, so next I took a deep breath and popped the iPhone 4S into the case. Here’s a short video of a swim to the bottom of a sink full of water (about ten inches deep): Wasn’t that fun? Not really. Anyway, I really didn’t feel like suiting up and going to the pool, or taking a shower with my iPhone. Remember, driSuit recommends that you don’t go below 5 meters underwater with the case, so any hopes of attaching a weight and line to the case to turn your iPhone into a cheap ROV is out of the question. Shooting underwater video in the hot tub? Fine. Just don’t send it to us. Conclusion It’s not the prettiest case in the world, but if you’re looking for protection from water or would like to use your iPhone while snorkeling to take video, the driSuit is going to do the job for you. With the positive feedback you get from the latches, you’ll be sure that your iPhone is going to remain dry while it’s in the driSuit endurance case. Pros Excellent waterproofing tested down to 5 meters Unique fluidic membrane over screen feels odd, but works great to insure touchscreen accuracy underwater Price is less than some competing waterproof cases Latch mechanism is good feedback for knowing that the case is completely closed Cons Kind of a boring design, but it definitely delivers in the waterproofing department Who is it for? Anyone who wants to use an iPhone in or around water, particularly surfers. Skiers or hikers who get into wet conditions are going to love this case. driSuit endurance case: Take your iPhone swimming originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Sat, 11 Aug 2012 15:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Source  |  Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

See the article here:
driSuit endurance case: Take your iPhone swimming

Apple’s original software construction kit: HyperCard turns twenty-five years old today

Twenty-five years ago today, HyperCard was released at Macworld Expo Boston. Apple’s software construction kit for the rest of us began shipping on every new Mac as of August 11, 1987 ; you could also buy it for $49. It required 1 MB of memory (yes, one megabyte) and a pair of 800K floppy drives, or one floppy drive + a hard disk. (Announced at the same time: the ImageWriter LQ, the Apple Fax Modem, and MultiFinder .) Times have indeed changed. For those who haven’t been playing along at home for quite that long, HyperCard was an application where you could develop (or download, share or buy) all manner of ‘stacks,’ and those stacks used individual cards as the metaphor for a screenful of information. Linking those cards together in stacks was how you built things in HyperCard, whether they were stacks of all your recipes, basic presentation decks pre-PowerPoint, or, you know, one of the biggest selling PC games ever. I started dabbling with HyperCard because at one point on the school computers it was the last application I hadn’t actually played with. It was sort of intimidating to look at by itself, but as I saw other stacks and figured out how to assemble them, I wrote a Choose Your Own Adventure-style story where you could navigate with buttons at the bottoms of the pages. I adored HyperCard. It let me feel like I had a tiny bit of control over one little piece of that Mac. I did like five or six stories, and then I built a recipe stack, and I played with a variety of other stacks, just to see what they could do. Part of what got my attention about RunRev’s LiveCode development suite, when I saw it in action at MacTech this year, was when they mentioned converting HyperCard stacks into LiveCode projects . I’d convert all my old stacks, if I could just find them someplace… Ars Technica had a nice writeup earlier this year , and it prompted our own Steve Sande to reminisce about his experience with HyperCard as well. Speculation about why HyperCard was left to wither and die is also out there, as is a brief chat with creator Bill Atkinson about his feelings towards his brainchild (check out his iPhone PhotoCard app). Robin Sloan and Contents magazine made a web essay into a stack . There’s even a HyperCard Twitter account . Sadly, Hypercard was removed from the Apple landscape in 2004, and emulating an environment for it gets fiddlier all the time. There are some similar products if you want to play around a little, including LiveCode and SuperCard . It’s also a lovely reminder to the old school among us, because it doesn’t seem that long ago until you see that it has been twenty-five years. Now I have to go chase those kids off my lawn… Apple’s original software construction kit: HyperCard turns twenty-five years old today originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Sat, 11 Aug 2012 18:15:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Source  |  Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

Visit link:
Apple’s original software construction kit: HyperCard turns twenty-five years old today

Daily iPhone App: Super Mole Escape is high-speed digging fun

Super Mole Escape is the latest title from Adult Swim Games, a publisher that’s been surprisingly adept (for a television network, anyway) at bringing great games out on iOS. This one is put together by the same studio that did Robot Unicorn Attack, and it’s an endless runner in the vein of Jetpack Joyride that has you digging down instead of running to the side. In that sense, it’s also akin to the popular Duckers — you guide a mole down through the dirt, trying to collect gems to gain speed boosts and other powerups on the way. Like all of these endless runners, the goal is just to get as far as you can (in this case before the mole police catch up with you), and there are all kinds of upgrades and extra characters to buy as well. The action is fun, goofy, and colorful — tilting isn’t my favorite mechanic (I think I’d rather be able to draw a line on the screen or guide the mole a little more accurately), but it works, and nailing all of the gems in a line gives that very rewarding speed boost. Super Mole Escape is another gem in Adult Swim’s princely crown on the App Store. It’s a little more derivative than Robot Unicorn Attack or the great Monsters Ate My Condo (two other AS-published titles), but it’s still a nice bit of fun for just 99 cents. Daily iPhone App: Super Mole Escape is high-speed digging fun originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Fri, 10 Aug 2012 20:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Source  |  Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

See more here:
Daily iPhone App: Super Mole Escape is high-speed digging fun

ATD: Samsung could have licensed Apple patents in 2010

Sitting through a patent trial day after day is a tough assignment for AllThingsD’s Ina Fried , as today’s technical testimony led the judge to inquire of the jury if anyone needed caffeine. But the flip side of the eyelid-drooping legal process is the occasional scoop. Tonight ATD reports that Samsung had an opportunity to license Apple patents at a per-device fee way back in 2010. Apple executives had told Samsung brass that the Korean company’s phones and tablets were infringing Apple IP in the summer of 2010. Keeping in mind that Samsung was (and remains) a key Apple parts supplier, the US company apparently swallowed hard and made an offer to cross-license relevant patents in October 2010. ” Samsung chose to embrace and imitate Apple’s iPhone archetype, ” reads Apple’s presentation to Samsung. “Apple would have preferred that Samsung request a license to do this in advance. Because Samsung is a strategic supplier to Apple, we are prepared to offer a royalty-bearing license for this category of device ” (emphasis Apple’s). Samsung would have owed royalties of $30 on each affected phone and $40 per tablet (dipping to $30 per over 2 years), with some steep discount options. Samsung’s entire line of touchscreen phones would have come under the proposed agreement, including Symbian and Bada phones in addition to Android-based units. Apple estimated the total 2010 license payments at US$250 million, noting that “[these] figures pale in comparison to Apple-Samsung’s balance-of-trade.” You can read the whole deck here , and it’s fascinating. Given the high costs of litigation, expert witnesses and adverse publicity from the ongoing dispute — balanced out with the advantage of being free and clear, worldwide, from injunctions and patent challenges from Apple — it all makes one believe that maybe Samsung should have thought longer and harder about taking the deal. (For a giggle, check out slide 17 — as Mark Gurman points out, Apple’s “iPhone 4″ looks a lot like it’s showing the screen of an original iPhone instead…) Photo by kasia | flickr cc ATD: Samsung could have licensed Apple patents in 2010 originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Fri, 10 Aug 2012 22:15:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Source  |  Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

Original post:
ATD: Samsung could have licensed Apple patents in 2010

Another stealth tethering app will probably be pulled off the App Store any second…

These things tend not to survive long in the wild , but it’s your $2, have fun: audio capture iPhone app DiscoRecorder apparently has a secret, and it’s an Easter egg proxy server. If you follow a rather rococo set of network config steps ( detailed by 9to5Mac ), make a recording, and rename it “PearSauce269.aac” (really? OK, sure, why not) then voila! Free tethering, regardless of your iPhone data plan (but that will still use up your data allocation). Note that this will only work from your Mac, not your iPad, as it requires you to create an ad-hoc network to start with. Given that the discovery of this feature was coincidentally and/or conveniently timed for a Friday evening, when the App Store minders have presumably fixie-biked off into the Cupertino sunset, there’s at least some chance the app will still be on the store in the morning — but needless to say this is not a good long-term plan for tethering. [hat tip Giz ] Another stealth tethering app will probably be pulled off the App Store any second… originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Fri, 10 Aug 2012 22:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Source  |  Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

More:
Another stealth tethering app will probably be pulled off the App Store any second…