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TUAW and MacTech interview at WWDC 2012: Marketcircle

In this video, Neil Ticktin (Editor-in-Chief, MacTech Magazine) interviews AJ of Marketcircle Inc. (makers of the Daylite contact manager suite + Billings tools for Mac and iOS) at WWDC 2012. AJ was kind enough to tell us about his thoughts on the announcements on WWDC, and how it will affect Marketcircle’s plans moving forward. Continue reading TUAW and MacTech interview at WWDC 2012: Marketcircle TUAW and MacTech interview at WWDC 2012: Marketcircle originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Sun, 05 Aug 2012 11:01:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Source  |  Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

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TUAW and MacTech interview at WWDC 2012: Marketcircle

Why entrepreneurs look to Steve Jobs for guidance (and why they shouldn’t)

There’s something about the juxtaposition of Apple stories and religious imagery that hits Wired magazine’s design team right where they live. In 1997, the magazine’s notorious 101 Ways to Save Apple story was represented on the cover by an Apple logo circled in a martyr’s crown of thorns ; this month, cover subject Steve Jobs is graced with both an angel’s halo and a pair of devil’s horns . (If we get to a cover of Tim Cook, Jony Ive and Scott Forstall dressed as a minister, a rabbi and an imam, I’m canceling my subscription.) Ben Austen’s story , about the impact Steve’s legacy has on today’s entrepreneurs, is worth a read. Whether they take the Jobs story as a model for business behavior — don’t accept anything but the best, push people as hard as you have to, rules are for the other guy — or as a cautionary tale, there’s no figure in business as compelling or polarizing as Apple’s co-founder. Austen got takes on Jobs from Square engineer Tristan O’Tierney, Box founder Aaron Levie, StackExchange’s Jeff Atwood and Metafilter’s Matt Haughey, among others. Jobs biographer Walter Isaacson told Austen he thinks many of his readers are drawing the wrong lessons by focusing on the abrasive nature of Steve’s personality, rather than the true keys to his success. Isaacson published a corrective essay in the Harvard Business Review (paywall) covering 14 core characteristics that helped make Steve (and Apple, and Pixar) successful. For company founders, managers and leaders who take Steve Jobs as their model, my observation is this: Yes, Steve Jobs maintained the loyalty of his closest colleagues and got incredible work out of a vast enterprise while, it is generally believed, treating people like shit. You may think that this is an approach worth emulating, but you should also remember that you’re not Steve Jobs , and you may not get away with it the way he did. Continue reading Why entrepreneurs look to Steve Jobs for guidance (and why they shouldn’t) Why entrepreneurs look to Steve Jobs for guidance (and why they shouldn’t) originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Sun, 05 Aug 2012 13:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Source  |  Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

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Why entrepreneurs look to Steve Jobs for guidance (and why they shouldn’t)

Talkcast tonight, 7pm PT/10pm ET: Dog days edition!

It’s Sunday again, like it or not, and as long as you can turn the air conditioner down low enough so the noise doesn’t drown it out, you can join us tonight to record the Talkcast ! We’ll be discussing the latest and greatest (or not so greatest) news on Mountain Lion , the Apple/Samsung Showcase Legal Showdown , and include a PSA about security . It may be a warm one where you are, so tonight’s Aftershow will likely include topics that go well with ice. Now it’s really all about you, the community, so join me won’t you? To participate, you can use the browser-only Talkshoe client , the embedded Facebook app , or download the classic TalkShoe Pro Java client ; however, for +5 Interactivity, you should call in. For the web UI, just click the Talkshoe Web button on our profile page at 4 HI/7 PDT/10 pm EDT Sunday. To call in on regular phone or VoIP lines (Viva free weekend minutes!): dial (724) 444-7444 and enter our talkcast ID, 45077 — during the call, you can request to talk by keying in *8. If you’ve got a headset or microphone handy on your Mac, you can connect via the free X-Lite or other SIP clients; basic instructions are here. Talk to you tonight! Talkcast tonight, 7pm PT/10pm ET: Dog days edition! originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Sun, 05 Aug 2012 16:15:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Source  |  Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

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Talkcast tonight, 7pm PT/10pm ET: Dog days edition!

Mountain Lion bugs: Chopped battery life and nonsensical ‘Save As’ behavior

It’s inevitable that with new operating systems come new bugs. One widely-reported bug has affected a noticeable chunk of laptop Mac users who’ve upgraded to OS X Mountain Lion: some users are reporting steep declines in battery life . A poll at Engadget shows that over 7400 of nearly 17,500 respondents who’ve installed Mountain Lion (42 percent) say they’ve noticed a definite and discernible drop in battery life. A similar poll at RazorianFly suggests that the 2011 models are disproportionately affected, but that may be sample bias. Battery problem reports came out last year when OS X Lion launched. The problem with these bugs is it’s nearly impossible to predict which systems will be affected or under what circumstances; my Early 2008 MacBook Pro has had no observable loss of battery life under Mountain Lion, but a brand-new MacBook Pro may well see battery life declines of 20 percent or more. No one has tracked down a specific cause or a fix yet , including Apple. However, it’s safe to assume this will be a top priority for the forthcoming 10.8.1 update, so don’t start sharpening those class-action lawsuit claws just yet. Far more concerning is the way “Save As” works in Mountain Lion. You’ll recall that Mountain Lion brought “Save As” functionality back to OS X, which spared us from a year of workflow-breaking “Duplicate” then “Save” hoop-jumping. Fellow TUAW blogger TJ Luoma even figured out how to change the menu commands around so “Save As…” showed up by default instead of “Duplicate” in the systemwide “File” menu. Unfortunately, it turns out that Mountain Lion has answered a question no one thought to ask until now: When is “Save As…” not really “Save As…”? The answer is surprising and somewhat distressing. As Mac Performance Guide notes, the “Save As…” command in Mountain Lion saves changes in your new document and the original document . In my own testing, the reason seems to have something to do with Mountain Lion’s auto-save features. Initiating and completing a “Save As…” command will automatically close the original document and leave the new document in its place. The simple act of closing the original document triggers Mountain Lion’s auto-save feature, meaning the next time you open the original document, those changes will still be there. This could be a potential nightmare for document version management. My own testing in TextEdit and Preview documents showed that Mountain Lion’s handling of the “Save As…” function wasn’t at all what I’ve come to expect from nearly 30 years of using Macs. Anyone not familiar with the esoteric intricacies of Mountain Lion’s auto-save behaviors (in other words, the overwhelming majority of users) is likely to fall into a panic the next time they open their original and supposedly preserved document only to find something else entirely in front of them. Mountain Lion’s use of auto-versioning means you can always revert the original document back to its pre-”Save As…” state — but we shouldn’t have to, and counting on everyday users to be capable of navigating through the Versions interface to find their original document seems foolhardy at best. No. Just no. All of this means that the triumphant return of “Save As…” to Mountain Lion has turned out to be not so triumphant after all. The way the command worked in the past, your original document would be preserved without edits and would be waiting for you in its original state the next time you opened it. The new behavior in Mountain Lion is more complex, far more confusing, and has far more that can go wrong with it. Some people might say that the old methods of document management and versioning are old-fashioned, and the new way is better. As someone who regularly works on complex projects demanding meticulous version tracking, I respectfully disagree. This isn’t necessarily a “bug” in Mountain Lion, but it is conspicuously incongruous behaviour — and it’s also something Apple can improve for users, if it chooses to do so. Mountain Lion bugs: Chopped battery life and nonsensical ‘Save As’ behavior originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Sun, 05 Aug 2012 08:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Source  |  Permalink  |  Email this  |  Comments

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Mountain Lion bugs: Chopped battery life and nonsensical ‘Save As’ behavior